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East African Digital Farmers Conference and Exhibition 2018 (EADFC)

Enabling Farming through ICT & Innovation

East African Digital Farmers Conference and Exhibition 2018 (EADFC)

On the 29th – 31st of May 2018, KALRO in conjunction with Smart Farmer Magazine will hold the first Digital Farmers Conference and Exhibition in East Africa, at the Kenya Agriculture & Livestock Research Organization (KALRO) grounds in Nairobi County.

The regional conference seeks to help farmers and other value chain actors to harness the benefits of technology and data, and drive the adoption of these digital tools by farmers. It bring together end users, service providers, disseminators, regulators, policy formulators, and technology developers of ICT solutions in the agricultural sector for the region.

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Discussion: Nourished

Why have some African countries been more successful than others in battling malnutrition? 

We cordially invite you to a seminar at the Center for Development Research of Bonn University (ZEF) with Dr. Ousmane Badiane, Africa Director at the International Food and Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington D.C., Prof. Joachim von Braun, ZEF-Director, and Dr. Stefan Schmitz, Deputy Director General of the German Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). Our discussion will deal with the question why some African countries have been successful in their battle against malnutrition whilst others are still lagging behind. Date: Thursday, March 22, 2018, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Venue: The Center for Development Research (ZEF), Genscherallee 3, 53113 Bonn, Germany, ground floor, right conference room The Panel published the report "Nourished" last year. The German version “Ernährt” will be launched at our event on March 22.

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New Article Published: The potential of apps to study smallholder farming systems and more

A new article by Thomas Daum, Regina Birner, Hannes Buchwald and Ansgar Gerlicher, published in the magazine Rural 21, discusses the potential to use mobile tools for research and for project monitoring and evaluation purposes.

The digital revolution does not only offer new development opportunities for users in developing countries, it also provides fascinating new pathways for researchers and development practitioners. The authors report on their experience with the smartphone app Time Tracker, which was developed and tested in the context of PARI, to record daily activities of survey participants. They conclude that mobile tools and apps could enable us to get a much more nuanced understanding of complex smallholder farming systems in particular, and new and improved general insights into developing countries.

read full article here